‘I’m a refugee in my own town but the crosses will speak to them’ – Ó Beaglaoich adds to his campaign on Gaeltacht planning

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The well-known musician from Corca Dhuibhne says that the planning policies currently in place are the worst blow to the Irish language ‘from the Battle of Kinsale’

'I'm a refugee in my own town but the crosses will speak to them' - Ó Beaglaoich adds to his campaign on Gaeltacht planning

Well-known musician Breanndán Ó Beaglaoich says that the planning policies currently in place are the worst blow to the Irish language “from the Battle of Kinsale”.

Ó Beaglaoich is holding a protest to draw attention to planning permission in Corca Dhuibhe and the countryside.

Begley has erected 235 white crosses in Mórdhach Parish and has stated that people are being evicted as a result of planning policies.

The crosses represent the number of people living in Pocktown before the Great Famine – 235 in 1841. It has 12 red crosses erected in the field known as the Lynx and these crosses represent the number of people living in Pucktown today.

“The rules that are in place at the moment are the heaviest blow to the countryside since the Famine,” said Ó Beaglaoich. The Southern Life on RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta.

“From our point of view in the Gaeltacht, we, the people of the Gaeltacht, are not allowed to live in the houses where we were born, raised. Where we found Irish, the music. It is the worst blow to the language since the Battle of Kinsale, ”Claimed Ó Beaglaoich. “If this continues, it will kill the Gaeltacht clean.”

Kerry County Council has instructed Beg to build a wooden house he built on a lorry trailer from its location in Pocktown without delay, as it was placed there without planning permission.

“I am a refugee in my own home. That’s what I say, ”said Ó Beaglaoich.

The musician built the house in 2015 after spending 13 years applying for planning permission to build a house on his family’s farm, where he was born and raised.

The county council claims that the house is too intrusive on the landscape and could establish a habit of suburban ribbon development in a vulnerable open area.

Ó Beaglaoich said that there is too much emphasis on the scene in planning policies.

“What I liked to do was to go around to the towns and find out what the heart of the town is. And that the rules in force in industrial estates be enforced. That we can build houses and not have to have half an acre in front of us, ”said Ó Beaglaoich.

“Where would they be breaking up a green famine in Dingle with an estate here? This is my estate. They call it Pocktown. ”

Begley says he is to continue the protest until he succeeds. He says he plans to head into Tralee next Monday when county councilors and planners gather.

“We intend to go in, without breaking any rules, abide by the rules of the Chovid… I will bring the crosses – stand there without saying a word, protest silently. The crosses will speak to them. ”

The Council is currently drafting the Kerry County Development Plan 2022-2028 and Begley believes that there is now an opportunity to change the rules.

“It simply came to our notice then. If we do not stand up, we have insulted our heritage and those who have gone before us and the next generation will never forgive us. ”

Kerry County Council argues that the house is too intrusive on the landscape and may establish a habit of suburban ribbon development in a vulnerable open area.

The Council has denied that the people of the Gaeltacht are being treated unfairly in relation to planning permission and states that 70% of the applications for planning permission in the area were approved between March 2015 and 31 December 2019.