The phallic representation present in this Roman stone was discovered in England

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Brian Adam
Professional Blogger, V logger, traveler and explorer of new horizons.
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The phallic representation present in this Roman stone was discovered in England

UK scholars, studying a 2,000-year-old stone block that broke off a millstone, revealed a gigantic phallus-shaped incision. It is likely that the entire fragile structure of which this small boulder was a part was created during the Roman rule in the British Isles.

To understand the events that have allowed the academic community to arrive at this bizarre representation, we must take a step back in time and go back, between 2017 and 2018.

According to the Oxford Archeology body, at that time, in an area near Cambridge, there was a project for the construction of the A14 motorway. In order to continue, however, with the work, it was necessary to conduct archaeological research to ensure that the area was free from any historical relics.

For this reason, a series of excavations began, which brought to light, within a year, about 300 ancient millstones. Among the hundreds of these, however, as stated in the study published in the journal “British“, the scholars noted a particular stone block, detached from one of these tools for grinding grain. It had very recognizable signs: two crosses carved in the lower part and a large phallus in the upper part – the latter, among other things, in excellent condition.

As explained in previous news, the depiction of male genitals was by no means bizarre during the Roman era. Scattered around the world, even on Hadrian’s Wall, hundreds of artifacts (especially amulets) have been found with this precise image.

It is possible that, in the case of this stone, there are two precise reasons that justify its presence: first of all, grinding the grain was a manual work that required, albeit with the aid of a rudimentary machine, a large power and the phallus was precisely the symbol of this and of virility; secondly, the Romans believed that depicting male genitalia in objects was a small ritual necessary to make protect oneself and the community from evil spirits, which could have brought famine and suffering.

However, excavations conducted near Cambridge they didn’t just unearth this bizarre object. Other discoveries include: fragments of mammoth and rhino tusks, one of the oldest evidence of an English brewery (dating back to 400 BC) and even the second gold coin representing the little-known emperor Ulpio Cornelio Leliano (or Lolliano), who, usurping the title, ruled only two months – before dying in 269 AD

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