web

Twitter and the attack on profiles: access to internal systems, stolen data and changed passwords

Must Read

Brian Adam
Professional Blogger, V logger, traveler and explorer of new horizons.
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Twitter and the attack on profiles: access to internal systems, stolen data and changed passwords

We have already dealt with the hacker attack suffered by 130 Twitter accounts on these pages, including those belonging to prominent characters from various worlds, from tech to politics. Just to give you some examples, the list of names includes Elon Musk, Joe Biden, Kanye West, Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and Apple’s corporate account.

For the uninitiated, some attackers have managed to take control of these 130 profiles and publish the same tweet, which was essentially a Bitcoin scam, where it was said that all Bitcoins sent to a specific address would be doubled. Put simply, hackers promised to give, for example, two thousand dollars in Bitcoin to those who sent one thousand to the address published on the profiles of various characters and companies. In short, we are talking about a not insignificant problem, since the attackers managed to defraud many people, receiving around 112,000 dollars in a few hours.

Twitter ran for cover in the shortest time possible, temporarily blocking the various accounts involved and avoiding the spread of the scam. However, the damage had now been done. In fact, according to what reported by Engadget and as confirmed by Twitter itself through its official support account, the hackers would have been able to download, through the tool “Your Twitter data”, private information related to 8 accounts. Initially, it was thought that the attack involved only verified profiles, but apparently, these eight profiles were not and therefore the attackers could have pointed to other types of sensitive information as well.

Twitter said that it will not reveal the identity of the accounts involved, but will only analyze the situation with those directly concerned. However, that’s not all here, given that in a post published on official Twitter blog it is said that hackers managed to “manipulate a limited number of employees and use their credentials for access internal Twitter systems, also going beyond two-factor authentication“.

The company says the attackers would use these tools, which would typically only be available to the company’s internal support team, to target the aforementioned 130 accounts. Specifically, hackers would have been able to ask for a password reset and access 45 profiles, coming to publish the tweet that generated the chaos of the last few days. If you think it’s over here, you’re wrong. In fact, the official Twitter portal reads: “We believe that someone may have attempted to sell some of the usernames“.

In short, as the hours go by, we discover more and more about what different international sources call “the biggest hacker attack in Twitter history“.

- Advertisement -

Subscribe to our newsletter

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.